Scientists Aim to Bring the Tasmanian Tiger Back From Extinction

Scientists in Australia and the US have launched an ambitious multimillion-dollar project to bring back thylacine, a marsupial that ended in the 1930s, and reintroduced it to its native Tasmania.

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Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger, is the second venture of Texas-based biotechnology "de-extinction" company Colossal, which announced last year that it planned to carry out genetic use.

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Its new project is a partnership with the University of Melbourne, which received a $5m philanthropic gift to open the Thylacine genetic restoration laboratory earlier this year.

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The lab's team has previously sequenced the genome of a juvenile specimen held by Museum Victoria, which its leader, Prof. Andrew Pask, has provided "essentially a complete blueprint on how to make a thylacine."

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Thylacine was Australia's only marsupial apex predator. It once lived throughout the continent, but was confined to Tasmania about 3,000 years ago. Look like a dog

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Stripes on its back, it was extensively hunted after European colonization. The last known survivor died in captivity in 1936. Despite hundreds of alleged sightings

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Scientists aim to reverse this by taking stem cells from living species with similar DNA, fat-tailed Dunnert— and turning them into "thylacine" cells—or the closest approximation.

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